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  • Nancy Solak - Men and their egos

    This book fascinated me in many ways. Before reading it, I’d never had an understanding of how chaotic life must have been in ancient Israel. Take the money changers as an example. I never understood why they were exchanging money (even though I took a course on the New Testament in college), or how corrupt the clergy were. Thousands of years later, the practice of extorting money from commoners (such as my aunt) to gain plenary indulgence today on earth for admittance into heaven later would continue. My aunt is long dead, as are the clergymen who took her money to line their pockets and festoon their churches. If that wasn’t enough, I see now why independent, liberal leaning feminists have a clear distaste for Paul, formerly known as Saul. He indeed took on the persona of rock star (we can call him a rock star of the ages), who made himself into a pillar of the Catholic church yet wasn’t even alive when Jesus the prophet walked, talked and died on earth. How Paul managed to turn everything Jesus the prophet did upside down is beyond me. It reminded me of all the times I remember men turning things upside down to suit their own egos. I believe, though, that Paul’s sleight of hand left me scarred. The fact that I still like men after reading this book is the most stunning miracle of them all. This book may have just as easily been titled "Men and Their Egos."

  • Transfer998 - Perfect

    First off if you want to buy one DO NOT PAY MORE THAN 499.99 for 32Gb. I bought mine from GameStop because people were selling theirs on here with jacked up prices. The MSRP is 499.99 and 599.99 for the 32Gb and 64Gb respectively, and the docks are 149.99. If you go on ASUS's store and look at the accessories that will give you the max you should pay for them. Anyways, this tablet is top of the line end of story. The quad core Tegra 3 gives great performance and great battery life. The tablet can output thru the micro-HDMI port full 1080p and 3D for certain games, tested the 3D on my friends TV and no hiccups or performance issues. The screen is amazing also the IPS+ will be great for those summer days when im working on my projects outside, I have done some rough simulations indoors but I cant wait to see how it does in the noon sun of the Midwest. Size wise it is thin and light, physically thinner and lighter than the iPad 2 but trust me you wont notice. The camera's are good don't expect professional quality but they can hold there own with any tablet on the market. The battery life is great I squeezed out 16 hrs today (no WiFi, Bluetooth, no back-light and on power saver mode) but on the average i get 11-13 hrs, about 7-8 hrs when im playing games that use the full potential of the Nvidia Tegra 3. Overall this is the best tablet I have tested, i loved it so much I bought one even tho ASUS is coming out with a revision in about 3-6 months (ASUS Transformer TF700)that has a full 1080p display. Honestly I don't need a 1080p display on my tablet a) all my stuff on my computer is 720p which works fine with the Prime's display b) you're not going to notice much difference on a 10.1" display other than 1080p files are going to be larger and c) its 100$ more.

    Overall great product. the only con i have about it is that amazon(us) didn't sell it, only amazon Canada did, and no I am not going to count the people or companies selling the prime thru amazon since they are not ASUS registered sellers.

    Update 1 year later with JB (4.1 waiting on 4.2):
    still the best tablet on the market in my opinion sure you don't have the stylus oops I mean S-pen as the notes but the killer feature is its keyboard dock, I average about 18-20 hrs running videos and over 20 doing simple tasks. the only down side is its wifi but its not as bad as people make it out to be. Sure its not as sensitive as the newer ones but really there's not much difference, all the area's that are dead with my prime is dead with my friends infinity and speeds are comparable ~2%. ASUS has really worked hard on making the wifi and the GPS better and they have improved greatly since day 1. Overall performance is still great even tho there are newer and shinier tablets, but the tegra 3 is showing its age with the tegra 4 coming soon, can you say xbox 360/PS3 graphics on a tablet? finally I have read people complaining that the graphics look no different than on their phone, all I have to say is look for games labeled "THD" (tegra HD) they bring out the most of a tegra device, standard games like "where's my perry" or "shadowgun" are designed for all android systems but "ShadowGun THD" is going to be better since it was developed with the tegra in mind. Just because you put an ps1 game in a ps3, doesnet make the game have ps3 graphics and physics, same applies for apps.

  • otterspotter1189 - Me and the Gals approve

    I just got one of these because you can get a really good job if you are in one. That's the buzz on the street. (I'm not sold on the name though. Binder of Women is sort of, I dunno, demeaning? Condescending? Objectifying? Naaaaaaw. I'm overreacting!)

    Ok! I'm not that limber anymore so I'm doing some yoga hellow kitty poses to stretch the hambones. Ok! Now I'm scootching my boohonky up on the edge. Straddling this thing is NOT the highlight of my day (aww, it just ruined my pantyhose). OK! Gathering my courage here! Taking the plunge in-to the binder o' women!

    (One hour later)
    Hey! Me here with the gals, we're sending out for pizza and beer. None of us have received a job offer yet, but we are pretty optimistic, this little gang of mine! Sigh, still the binder hasn't moved once off this desk. Anyone, anyone??

  • Peter Vize "dpdv" - insightful as always...

    The purpose of this work is very straightforward- to argue that there are better ways to make moral decisions than religion. Harris makes some very clear points, that few could argue against, in which science clearly is more than capable of showing what the right decision is in on moral questions. This basic argument is all this book needs to be a major contribution to politics, philosophy, and we can only wish, religion.

    Detractors of the book tend to delve into philosophical arguments using formal terminologies that most of us don't care about. What is right and what is less right is the premise that is being explored. Harris has to my knowledge not been formally trained as a philosopher, but that does not mean his argument fails- simply that philosophers (who have in the past failed to do much in this area that has contributed to public awareness and discussion) have something to start working with. This is how science works, you start with observation, then a hypothesis, then experiments and testing. So dropping the pointless objections to is-ought errors and getting to the moral point would be a better use of the philosopher's time. The other detraction that is levelled is the lack of empirical data to back up claims in the discussion of what is the correct basis for making decisions about well being. Once again I think this is missing the point and the average reader will not want to read psychology test scores, look at neuron action potentials or sheets of statistics. The use cases Harris presents clearly show that science can make the determination between what is good and what is less good and that is the central issue. There are obviously more difficult scenarios but this is also encountered by those who propose morals should be based on religion, and what is right and wrong differs vastly according to the religion consulted. Given time, thought and experiment scientific solutions to these more complex situations will be apparent.

    This is a thought provoking and brave book that provides a framework for making moral arguments about the human condition. It is a critical contribution to humankind, and how we should orient our moral compasses.